Agri-Shop Ltd
23 October 2016 | Online since 2003

FarmingUK Logo
26 October 2012 11:16:45 |

Buyers meet to discuss US corn crop future

Teams of international grain buyers fanned out across America, from Ohio to Washington State, and Minnesota to Louisiana to assess the current U.S. corn crop.
More than 200 international buyers and end-users had flocked to Minneapolis from Oct. 22-24 to meet with U.S. suppliers and to hear from industry and government leaders about the near- and long-term prospects for U.S. export capacity.
CHS President and CEO Carl Casale’s keynote address set the theme: managing risk in the face of soaring demand for feed grains, a short U.S. crop in 2012, and major uncertainties on the geopolitical horizon.
USDA Chief Economist Joe Glauber, farmer and industry leaders, and observations from major foreign buyers and end-users of U.S. feed grains rounded out the picture.
"Everyone present - more than 200 foreign guests and about 300 U.S. producer and agribusiness representatives - recognized that this will be a challenging year" said US Grains Council President Tom Sleight.
"That’s why our international partners are so eager to talk with U.S. producers about their intentions and prospects for next year."
Teams from Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Turkey, Mexico and Taiwan got a head start, visiting U.S. farms, agribusinesses, and export terminals before heading to Minneapolis.
Following Export Exchange, even more teams hit the road: a Japanese team to Iowa and Minnesota; a European team to Nebraska; a Chinese team to Ohio and Louisiana, among others.
"It’s one thing to sit in a conference room and hear industry and government leaders talk about how U.S. producers always bounce back strong,” Sleight continued.
"Export Exchange provided that, and more. But there is still no substitute for the ground truth you get from getting out into the field, and talking directly to farmers and exporters. That’s what our Export Exchange guests are doing now."
Many participants expressed a continuing preference for buying U.S. grains due to the consistency and quality of the grain and the transparency and reliability of the U.S. marketing and delivery systems.
While price and availability will clearly be major impediments to U.S. exports this year, due to the drought, the buyer sentiment was clear: they are looking forward to a better crop next year, and a U.S. export sector that comes back strong.


1 Comment


Please enter your name


Please enter your email

Please enter valid email


Please enter your comment

Post Comment

Your comment has been submitted successfully. Please wait for admin approval.


Australia | 21 October 2016
Local bloc seeks to counter bid for Australian cattle empire

Nationalist lawmakers have teamed up with local ranchers to try to counter a bid involving Chinese buyers for the S. Kidman & Co. cattle empire, in what would be one of Australia’s biggest agribusines...

USA | 21 October 2016
Arizona farmers give back by donating milk to food banks

43 million gallons of milk have been dumped in fields across the country since the start of the year. That's why many American farmers have been forced to do with lower milk prices not bringing in...

USA | 21 October 2016
Your groceries may be cheaper, but farmers and supermarkets feel the pain

If you’re just a little irked that gasoline prices have edged up recently, maybe this will cheer you up: Groceries are a bargain. Average supermarket prices fell 2.2% in September from a year ago, ...

Canada | 21 October 2016
Farmers fail to rally to tax revolt talk

If farmland property taxes are too high, don’t pay them. That’s what Dugald farmer Edgar Scheurer suggested while commenting on Facebook about Manitoba Co-operator stories on skyrocketing farmland ...

United Kingdom | 21 October 2016
Woman killed in cattle attack on family farm

A woman has been killed after she was attacked by cattle on a family farm in Co Derry. The pensioner, who has been named locally as Brigid McKeefry and is aged in her 70s, was rushed to the Causewa...

Trending Now


Top stories you may have missed