HROC (agency) - Kubota
Farminguk
30 June 2016 | Online since 2003
OvoConcept


20 September 2012 15:32:04|

GM regulation criticised as new study shows health dangers


The European Commission is pushing through a new draft Regulation that weakens the way genetically modified (GM) foods are assessed for safety.
The Commission's move comes just as new research has revealed that a GM maize already approved in Europe for use in food and feed, can cause tumours, premature death and organ damage at levels claimed to be safe by EU regulatory authorities.
A new study found that rats fed over two years with GM maize at levels permitted in drinking water, food and feed, died earlier than rats fed on a non-GM diet, according to research conducted by French scientists who carried out the trial.
"If adopted, the draft Regulation will leave the public even more exposed to serious health risks such as those revealed by the new study" said Claire Robinson, research director at Earth Open Source.
The report says the draft Regulation undermines democratically established EU GMO legislation and 'betrays' demands in 2008 by the EU Environment Council that the EU's GMO safety assessment be strengthened.
The draft Regulation has not been subjected to formal Parliamentary scrutiny but will be voted on in a behind-closed-doors Commission committee on an undisclosed date in the coming weeks.
Activists are calling on the Commission to freeze the progress of the draft regulation and open it to full public consultation in light of the new scientific findings.
Yet EU authorities had approved this GM maize as safe, based on a short 90-day rat feeding trial commissioned by the crop's developer, Monsanto.
The new research shows that rats only began to develop tumours after four months – an effect that the 90-day feeding trials typically done for GMO assessments cannot detect, as 90 days is just too short.
The draft Regulation does not require long-term feeding trials and contains problematic wording that could enable even the weak 90-day study to be waived in future. This would fit the stance of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which has questioned the need for feeding trials. EFSA also claimed that 90-day trials are sufficient to identify long-term toxic effects.
The new study shows that EFSA's and the Commission's positions are faulty. Clearly feeding trials are necessary to reveal unexpected toxic effects. And they must be long-term. While 90-day trials failed to detect tumours and premature deaths, the longer 2-year study revealed this harm.
A 2009 analysis by independent scientists of industry's own 90-day trial data on NK603 maize showed that even this data revealed signs of liver and kidney toxicity. But the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) ignored these signs, concluding that NK603 was "as safe" as non-GM maize and "unlikely to have an adverse effect on human and animal health".
Claire Robinson said, "The history of this maize shows that EFSA is unfit for purpose and too close to the GM industry. EFSA's industry-friendly stance on GMOs has unfortunately infected the draft Regulation."

Download



2 Comment


Name

Please enter your name


Email

Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment submitted successfully.Please wait for admin approval.


Comments


Australia | 30 June 2016
Climate change forces European graziers to consider Aussie cattle

Rising temperatures and variable weather patterns caused by climate change will lead to a growing demand for tropical varieties of cattle in Europe, according to a German breeder. Sylvia Opitz and ...


USA | 30 June 2016
U.S. cattle auction halts activity in blow to producers, traders

Organizers of an online U.S. cattle auction that ranchers and traders had hoped would help restore transparency to livestock pricing nationwide said on Wednesday they would suspend activity indefinite...


USA | 30 June 2016
West Texas A&M's cloned cattle could beef up industry

West Texas A&M University researchers on Wednesday announced positive results in their quest to use cloning to consistently produce high-quality beef — and more of it per animal. A U.S. Department ...


Germany | 30 June 2016
'Cancer causing' weedkiller given go ahead by EU - as Germany and France hold it to ransom

Farmers across the bloc can continue using glyphosate for another 18 months after European health commissioner Vytenis Andriukaitis yesterday extended its licence before a June 30 deadline. The her...


Australia | 30 June 2016
Fonterra cut another blow to dairy farmers

The latest price cut from a major dairy producer could force some Australian farmers out of the industry as they struggle to break even. Fonterra Australia has joined Murray Goulburn and Bega Chees...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed

Farms and Land for sale

PropertyLocation
PropertyAgent
PropertyMinimumPrice
PropertyMaximumPrice
PropertyCategory

Holiday Rentals search

AccommodationKeyword
AccommodationType
AccommodationCounty
AccommodationStarRating


Top stories you may have missed
closeicon
Username
Password