CropTec Show
Farminguk
25 September 2016 | Online since 2003
Scrutton Bland


24 January 2012 12:13:59 |Feed and Forage,News

Hi-tech agriculture needed to tackle food poverty crisis


As MPs at Westminster discussed the issue of rising food prices and the impact of food poverty on the diets of lower income households, the Crop Protection Association has moved to highlight the critical role of modern, science-based agriculture in safeguarding the long-term availability and affordability of our food supply.
Monday’s opposition debate in the House of Commons, introduced by Shadow Environment Secretary Mary Creagh, revealed that since 2006, the combined impact of the recession and food price inflation had forced a 30% drop in fruit and vegetable consumption by families on lower incomes, who are now spending more than 15% of household income on food.
But while the debate focused mainly on the role of food banks and plans to create a supermarket ombudsman, CPA chief executive Dominic Dyer urged policy-makers to recognise that access to the most advanced farming technologies would also be essential to tackle the growing food poverty crisis.
"Mary Creagh is right to highlight the damaging consequences of food price inflation, and to consider what short-term measures can be taken to mitigate its effects. But the simple fact remains that food security is a strategic global issue, and the most realistic prospect of delivering a sustainable and affordable food future is through increased agricultural productivity."
"The key challenge therefore is to persuade decision-makers at an EU level that future farm policies must reflect the pressing global need to produce more food, because the reality is that current EU policy in areas such as biotechnology and crop protection is blocking progress and stifling investment in new research."
Mr Dyer also highlighted the findings of consumer research conducted for CPA in 2011, which showed that most shoppers believe the Government should be doing more to keep food prices down, and that science should be applied to help increase food output.
"Consumers understand the link between domestic food prices and the impact of global factors such as population growth, climate change and rising oil prices. As a result they are more willing to embrace the use of agricultural innovation in boosting food supplies."
"But advances in plant science and crop protection will continue to be denied to Europe’s food producers and consumers without a science-based EU regulatory environment," warned Mr Dyer.

Download

0 Comment

loginuserlogo
Name

Please enter your name


Email

Please enter your email

Please enter valid email


Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment has been submitted successfully. Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment


Ireland | 23 September 2016
Farmers who left safety net of EU subsidies to make fortune

Irish farmers have proved that they don't need subsidies from the EU to be massively successful in their chosen profession. Some have chosen to leave the payment safety net behind and seek their fortu...


China | 23 September 2016
China lays groundwork to be major producer of GMO crops

China has a fifth of the world’s population, but only about 7 percent of its arable land. Farming plus safe and healthy foods are national obsessions. So it came as no surprise that government-own...


USA | 23 September 2016
Drought grips parts of South, parches ground, withers crops

Extreme drought conditions are persisting in parts of Alabama and Georgia, wilting crops and raising the specter of wildfires. Thursday's U.S. Drought Monitor, a weekly report that tracks drought c...


China | 23 September 2016
China to reopen beef market to American producers after 13 years

American beef producers are expected get access to China for the first time in 13 years, raising the possibility that the U.S. could recapture lost market share in one of the fastest-growing global ma...


Australia | 23 September 2016
Greener pastures: the dairy farmers committed to sustainability

It was a soil bacteria course in New Zealand that convinced Reggie Davis to change his farming methods. The fourth-generation Victorian dairy farmer had become increasingly concerned by the costs, ...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed


Top stories you may have missed
FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A herd of rare White Park cattle could die out if its owners do not urgentl...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The UK government is "failing" to support farmers in the long-term accordin...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Retailer Co-op has announced that from May 2017 all of its bacon and lamb w...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Over 50 wildlife organisations have compiled a stock-take of all the UK's n...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

In the run up to the EU farm ministers meeting the agricultural sector have...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The RPA must iron out a number of problems that still exist with 2015 BPS p...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Tourism businesses in the countryside are being held back due to the uncert...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A 24 point action plan aimed at revitalising Scotland's sheep sector after ...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A new survey has revealed that the vast majority of British consumers belie...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The British public are overwhelmingly in favour of keeping or strengthening...


closeicon
Username
Password