Mole Valley Farmers
Farminguk
30 August 2016 | Online since 2003
Less co2 Limited


17 February 2012 16:53:36 |

Versadrill practice guide gives advice for soil management


A new soil management guide from Versadrill manufacturer Sumo aims to help farmers avoid the issues that can arise from compacted soils - whether in a dry year like 2011 or in a more normal year.
"Our guide, ’Best Practice for the Versadrill’, looks at the key husbandry issues surrounding crop establishment and the ways in which minimal tillage and direct drilling can be used to manipulate them," says Sumo’s drill specialist, Marcus Ainley. "The issues discussed include soil protection as a part of cross compliance, carbon offset, weed control, slug suppression, encouragement of earthworm populations and conservation agriculture.
"The move towards larger tractors and machinery over the last forty or more years with ever-deeper cultivations – and the use of powered tillage - has left a legacy of damaged soil structure and a reduction of organic matter in the soil. The result is that the land is more susceptible to compaction.
"But it’s not just the power and weight of the machinery or the depth of tillage. At whatever depth they are used, ploughs and discs leave a panned layer underneath the soil surface, creating an impermeable horizontal barrier. And the use of different tillage machinery in unsuitable conditions at different times and depths means this damage could be multi-layered."
Mr Ainley explains that compaction layers caused by mechanical damage restricts the movement of water, air and living organisms through the soil profile. This can have a very significant impact on yield, and makes the crop more reliant on applied fertilisers and chemicals to achieve the desired yields. In extreme cases, mechanical damage means moisture in the topsoil is unable to permeate the pan created by previous cultivations. The saturated topsoil then loses its structure and is unable to support weight.
He notes that waterlogged soil limits the diffusion of gases through soil pores, slowing oxygen influx to the roots and causing injury to the plant. It also impedes the escape of harmful gases such as ethylene and carbon dioxide, which can also lead to reduced growth and root damage, while trapped CO2 also forms ions that can affect the pH level of the soil. Also waterlogging may increase the level of soil-borne fungal diseases that can have an effect on germinating seed. These negative effects have a massive impact on crop productivity, highlighting the importance of getting drainage and soil structure right.

Download

0 Comment

loginuserlogo
Name

Please enter your name


Email

Please enter your email

Please enter valid email


Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment has been submitted successfully. Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment


Thailand | 30 August 2016
Overworked Agriculture minister wants a deputy

Agriculture Minister Chatchai Sarikulya has confirmed he wants a deputy minister appointed to share the growing workload at the Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives. Gen Chatchai said this when...


USA | 30 August 2016
Washington state begins killing wolf pack for preying on livestock

Wildlife agents authorized to eradicate a group of 11 wolves for repeated attacks on cattle in Washington state have hunted down and killed six animals from the condemned pack and are searching for th...


Ireland | 30 August 2016
Farm bodies clash on EU dairy package

The IFA and ICMSA have clashed on how a new €22m support package for the dairy sector should be spent. While IFA has suggested that the aid package be used to guarantee low interest farmer loans, I...


Australia | 30 August 2016
Beef soon to become a 'luxury item' as prices skyrocket

For many Aussies, splurging on a ribeye may be a thing of the past, as a global beef shortage has sent shockwaves through meat markets, sending menu prices soaring and diners out the door. Since th...


USA | 30 August 2016
In drought, drones help California farmers save every drop

A drone whirred to life in a cloud of dust, then shot hundreds of feet skyward for a bird's-eye view of a vast tomato field in California's Central Valley, the nation's most productive farming region....



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed


Top stories you may have missed
FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A new survey has revealed that the vast majority of British consumers belie...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The British public are overwhelmingly in favour of keeping or strengthening...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The sustained recovery of pig prices since the spring has come at a time wh...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A World Trade Organisation (WTO) panel has declared the Russian import ban ...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A new study has linked oilseed rape crops grown from neonicotinoid-treated ...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Philip Hammond is to guarantee billions of pounds of UK government investme...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Access to the foreign labour market is 'critical', according the chief exec...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The Tenant Farmers Association has said the National Trust's vision for a p...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Ulster farmers will 'not lie down and wave the white flag' when Brexit nego...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The cost of rural crime to the UK economy costs £42.5 million a year, accor...


closeicon
Username
Password