HROC (agency) - Kubota
Farminguk
24 July 2016 | Online since 2003
Auto Trader Ltd


26 March 2014 04:32:53|Animal Health,News

BVA concern at call for sick animals to be slaughtered


The British Veterinary Association is calling for a clarification of remarks made by the Chief Medical Officer in which she called for sick animals to be slaughtered rather than treated as part of the strategy to reduce antibiotic resistance in humans.
The Daily Mail reports that, speaking at the Cambridge Science Festival, CMO Dame Sally Davies called for a reduction in the use of antibiotics in farm animals and said that she had urged veterinary surgeons to slaughter badly infected animals rather than treat them.
Commenting, BVA President Robin Hargreaves, said: “As veterinary surgeons our first duty is to the animals under our care, and that means providing the most appropriate treatment. Badly infected animals may need to be slaughtered for their own good or for the good of the herd or flock. But those that have a good chance of recovery and the opportunity to be productive should be treated with the appropriate antibiotics used responsibly.
“To suggest that treatable animals should be slaughtered makes no sense in terms of animal health, public health, or the rural economy.
“It is unclear from the reported comments how such a strategy would be deployed and whether it would be extended to all animals, including pets. We are seeking clarification of the CMO’s comments to ensure that the debate is based on facts.
“We know that the biggest cause of antibiotic resistance in humans is the overuse and misuse of antibiotics in human medicine and this is highlighted in the joint report on resistance from the Department of Health and Defra.
“However, we are not complacent about the role of antibiotics use in veterinary medicine and we are one of the leading voices in the campaign for the responsible use of antibiotics in all species.
“Antibiotic resistance is a significant threat to animal and human health but the debate must be based on a sound assessment of the risks involved and sensible solutions.”

Download

0 Comment

loginuserlogo
Name

Please enter your name


Email

Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment submitted successfully.Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment


Australia | 22 July 2016
Laws surrounding foreign investment in farmland 'too restrictive'

A government-commissioned report into the regulatory burden imposed on Australian farmers has advised the federal government to lift "red tape" surrounding foreign investment in local agriculture, as ...


Germany | 22 July 2016
Bakery venture feeds German appetite for pesticide-free food

There's a booming demand in Germany for produce that is both locally sourced and free from chemicals. One cooperative in Karlsruhe is linking farmers producing pesticide-free grains with artisanal bak...


Australia | 22 July 2016
Australia's richest woman buys two cattle stations

Gina Rinehart's Hancock Prospecting has snapped up two cattle stations in the Northern Territory, adding to the billionaire's steadily expanding livestock portfolio. Hancock has acquired the Rivere...


Cambodia | 22 July 2016
You could own a piece of a Cambodian dairy startup

At a time when Nintendo’s Pokémon Go is taking over the world, the name Moo Moo Farms may conjure up imagery of pixelated princesses and plumbers whizzing along a cartoon racetrack. But it turns ou...


USA | 22 July 2016
Is it too late to invest in farmland?

Last week, I wrote an article called The Bull Thesis on Farmland in which I presented the asset class and explained why I believe it to be a good idea to add some farmland to your portfolio. I was...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed


Top stories you may have missed
closeicon
Username
Password