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26 August 2016 | Online since 2003
OvoConcept


9 April 2014 08:44:35 |Finance,News,Renewables

Bradford company invests £250,000 in its first wind turbine


A UK recycling and green energy company, the Leo Group, has invested £250,000 into its first wind turbine to help power its Bradford plant.
Erected at its Omega Proteins’ Erling Works in Half Acre Road, Denholme, the new turbine turns kinetic energy from the wind into electrical power which can be used for the day-to-day running of the estate, significantly reducing the business’s impact on the environment.
Since it was installed, the initiative has already offset more than 21,500 kg of carbon dioxide – a greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming.
By harnessing this natural power source, the energy saving so far is the equivalent to an individual carbon footprint created by flying twice around the world in a plane, or a computer being switched on for approaching 2,000 years.
Jane Brindle, Group Technical Manager at Leo Group, said: “As a company focused on renewable energy and sustainability, considering our impact on the environment is at the forefront of everything we do.
“We are all very excited about the introduction of this green energy supply for our Bradford site and will be closely monitoring the amount of energy it produces.
“The new wind turbine is an additional way that we are helping to further reduce the company’s carbon footprint.”
The turbine is the latest in a series of investments that further underlines the Leo Group’s commitment to renewable energy and sustainable business practices. Last year, to mark World Environment Day, the company planted 1,500 trees at the site as well as at its headquarters in Swalesmoor, Halifax.
In keeping with the company's policy of supporting local Yorkshire businesses wherever possible, the main contractor for this project was Newgen wind and solar engineers, based at Shepley, near Huddersfield.
Omega Proteins produces renewable energy sources used in cars and industry. One of the products produced by the company is tallow, a natural by-product from animal waste, which is a key component in the process to create an advanced form of biodiesel that can be used in modern diesel engines.
The Leo Group employs more than 400 people across its 10 operational sites in Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The company’s investment strategy sees 98% of its retained profits re-invested back into the business.
This includes long-term investment in renewable energy technologies to widen its service portfolio and diversify into energy generation through biomass fuels.

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