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25 July 2016 | Online since 2003
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13 February 2014 03:32:42|Animal Health,Other Livestock,Education,News

Bristol veterinary society hosts national student congress


What farmers will want from their veterinary surgeon in the future was one of the subjects discussed at the Farm Annual Veterinary Society’s 2014 congress held at the University of Bristol’s School of Veterinary Sciences at Langford.

Over 140 students from veterinary schools across the UK attended last weekend’s congress [8 and 9 February], which was organised by the Bristol Farm Animal Veterinary Society committee led by President and final year veterinary student, Jayne Black.

The students attended lectures from leading professionals in their field on various topics such as, deer health and disease, responsible use of medicines, cattle lameness, calving cows, sheep medicine and the health of young and growing cattle.

The lecture programme was supported by 20 practical sessions, many of which were undertaken at Wyndhurst Farm’s recently rebuilt dairy unit and the School’s state-of-the-art clinical skills laboratory, which includes some unique farm animal teaching models.

Along with other facilities at Langford, a wide range of practical workshops and seminars took place during the congress involving all major farmed species - cattle, sheep, pigs, poultry and camelids.

Professor David Barrett, Professor of Bovine Medicine, Production and Reproduction said: “The congress was inspirational, not only for the students studying in veterinary schools around the UK but for the many guests and contributors from across the veterinary, veterinary pharmaceutical and farming sectors that attended.

“As someone who has dedicated over 20 years to research and teaching food animal veterinary medicine, through some very difficult times for the sector, the enthusiasm and confidence from our veterinary surgeons of the future filled me with pride as I helped close the congress.”

During the weekend the students raised £600 to support local farmers struggling with the ongoing flooding problems on the Somerset Levels.

The congress was supported by over 20 leading veterinary practices and other farm and food related companies. Sponsorship was also provided by organisations, including a generous donation from the University of Bristol’s Alumni Foundation.

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