04 March 2015 | Online since 2003



17 July 2014|News,Renewables

Commitment to renewables slashes fossil fuel costs


A contemporary Borders family farming business that specialises in arable crops and free-range eggs has renewable energy generation at the heart of its successful operation.

Woodend Farming Partnership (WFP) is a family farm business formed by John and Louise Seed together with their daughter Lindsay and son Donald and is based at Woodend near Duns in Berwickshire.

It is a 200ha farm that has also established three renewable energy units - 950kW of biomass, 75kW of wind and 50kW of solar PV. This significant investment into renewable energy means that it has dramatically reduced its reliance on fossil fuels, slashed energy costs and can harvest and dry its crops quickly and efficiently.

All three renewable technologies will be on display on Tuesday, 22 July when John Seed hosts the latest on-farm event organised by NFU Scotland’s Renewable Development Initiative (RDI) to which any interested farmers are invited to attend.

The RDI, co-ordinated by Thomas McMillan of Smiths Gore, is helping Scottish farmers and land managers fulfil their energy generating potential. Through a programme of on-farm events, the initiative has already shown hundreds of Scottish farmers energy projects that are contributing to farm businesses or at the planning stage. RDI on-farm open days held across Scotland in the past six months have looked at wind, solar, biomass, hydro and anaerobic digestion.

Speaking ahead of the event, Mr John Seed said: “The farming sector has become too reliant on fossil fuels. Using renewable energy allows farmers to reduce the risk from volatile world fuel markets.

“Fossil fuel used to cost Woodend Farming Partnership £128,000 per year. Including the Renewable Heat Incentive and Feed In Tariff payments, energy costs are now a net positive. Farmers can’t change the price they receive for their crops, but they can influence their variable costs such as energy and fertiliser.

“The installations have also changed the way we go about our business. WFP can now cut our grain earlier, when it is at its best quality, instead of waiting for it to drop to 17% moisture as our grain drying set up means that drying is no longer a major cost.

“The mix of technologies has also given us a better balance to our energy generation. It’s windy in the winter, and sunny in the summer. By having solar panels and a wind turbine, this creates a more stable supply of electricity rather than reliance on just one technology. By comparison, biomass supplies heat all year round.”

Download



Comments


No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment

To post comment without approval login or register

Display name

Please enter your name

Email (optional)
Comment

Please enter your comment

Post Comment

Your comment submitted successfully.Please wait for admin approval.

Some error on your process.Please try one more time.



Jobs


19 February 2015
Kitchen Sales Design Apprentice - Bedford Elm Farm
Elms Farm Industrial Estate. Kitchen Sales Design Apprentice - Bedford Elm Farm. To work from plans in-store, establishing cu...

24 February 2015
AGRICULTURAL SOLICITOR - Bristol
There will also be the opportunity for occasional travel to work with their agriculture team based in Exeter. Agricultural So...

27 February 2015
Area Sales Manager - Kitchen & Bathroom Products
Actively prospect for new business and farm existing accounts within assigned territory. Area Sales Manager – Kitchen & B...

12 February 2015
HR Coordinator - Maidenhead
Provide daily ad-hoc administrative support to the Business Unit Director and HR Managers e.g. filtering calls, typing letter...

19 February 2015
Consultant in Intensive Care Medicine
It comprises Barnet Hospital, Chase Farm Hospital, the Royal Free Hospital and more than 30 services in the community....




Top stories you may have missed
2 February 2015 | Arable
Is EU membership damaging UK farming?

Is EU membership damaging UK farming?

Membership of the EU is damaging the British farming industry, according to...


29 January 2015 | Machinery and Equipment
Drones 'rapidly changing' agriculture

Drones 'rapidly changing' agriculture

BASIS has launched an accreditation for pilots of Unmanned Aerial Systems (...


23 January 2015 | Arable
UK wheat yields have potential to double

UK wheat yields have potential to double

UK wheat yields have theoretical potential to more than double over the nex...


23 January 2015 | Machinery and Equipment
Crowds flock to LAMMA 2015

Crowds flock to LAMMA 2015

Britain’s farmers flocked to Peterborough for the first day of LAMMA’15 to ...


22 January 2015 | Cattle
Don't blame supermarkets for milk crisis...

Don't blame supermarkets for milk crisis...

The crisis in the dairy industry is not the fault of supermarkets, accordin...


16 January 2015 | CLA
Families affected by HS2 face 'major wor...

Families affected by HS2 face 'major wor...

Transport Minister Baroness Kramer visited three rural businesses in Cheshi...


16 January 2015 | Machinery and Equipment
John Deere unveil new 6R tractor range

John Deere unveil new 6R tractor range

Spearheading the John Deere range of mid-size tractors from Mannheim, the n...


14 January 2015 | Animal Health
Monthly TB checks more effective than ba...

Monthly TB checks more effective than ba...

Regular testing for bovine TB could significantly reduce the number of infe...


12 January 2015 | News
Government regulations hampering UK agri...

Government regulations hampering UK agri...

Single-issue policy-making threatens to hamper, not help, the progress of U...


8 January 2015 | Cattle
2015: The year ahead for the beef market

2015: The year ahead for the beef market

2014 has been a “rocky old year” for the beef industry but better prices ar...