Mole Valley Farmers
Farminguk
31 August 2016 | Online since 2003
Scrutton Bland


30 July 2014 05:29:31 |News,Produce,Supermarkets

Country of origin of foods study published


The Food Standards Agency is today publishing the results of a study to look at the origin of foods claiming to be from the UK and Ireland. The study did not identify any cases of food on sale with misleading country of origin claims.
The study which used a screening technique known as stable isotope ratio analysis (SIRA) followed up with investigating traceability documentation. It examined 96 food samples (beef, pork, lamb, apple juice, tomatoes and honey) claimed to be from the UK, or from the Republic of Ireland. Samples were taken from mid-December 2013 to early January 2014.
Andrew Rhodes, Chief Operating Officer at the FSA, said: 'It’s vital that consumers are provided with a true picture as to where the food they buy comes from. If it says it’s produce from the UK then it should be. We wanted, in this study, to check whether people were receiving accurate information on the origin of their food and the results are reassuring for consumers and businesses.
'We also wanted to gain experience of using the relatively new SIRA technology as a tool to show the country of origin of foodstuffs. We found SIRA effective in raising questions about where a food comes from but we relied on traceability information to further investigate origin.
'Defra and the FSA are continuing to work with the research community and industry to improve our ability to test the origin of foods and we look to build on this useful piece of work in the months ahead.'
The samples were mostly taken from retail or wholesale outlets, although four samples of raw beef burgers were obtained from caterers. The samples were not fully representative of the market, but, within the limitations of a small study, provided a reasonable spread across retailers and across the four countries of the UK. Samples were taken from both top end food ranges and economy ranges.
Of the 96 samples screened using SIRA, 78 were shown immediately to be consistent with the origin claimed and 18 were identified for follow-up investigation. Traceability and other evidence were requested for 17 of these samples. In all 17 cases the evidence supplied supported the country of origin claim.
For food law authorities it is very valuable to have a screening test that can help target investigation. SIRA has been shown to have real potential. For some foods it is already a realistic possibility for enforcement authorities to use SIRA screening, although for others some further development would be beneficial.

Download

0 Comment

loginuserlogo
Name

Please enter your name


Email

Please enter your email

Please enter valid email


Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment has been submitted successfully. Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment


New Zealand | 31 August 2016
Agribusiness: Managing risk key to dairy farming future

Few industries generate as much discussion or concern in New Zealand as dairy farming. Currently, there is much discussion about the high levels of dairy debt. Those with long memories will know th...


USA | 31 August 2016
Farmworker overtime bill is another factor in agricultural evolution

Everyone knows about the California Gold Rush – the massive migration of fortune seekers to the hills of the former Spanish colony in the 1840s and 1850s. During the same period, however, there was...


Australia | 31 August 2016
Cattle exporter misses prospectus targets

Live cattle exporter Wellard Group has missed its prospectus forecasts on revenue, profit and margins, booking a $23 million annual loss instead of the forecast $9 million net profit. Stripping out...


USA | 31 August 2016
The future of agriculture could rest with self driving tractors

With all the talk of autonomous cars from Tesla’s master plan to take on Uber to the legacy automotive players like Ford and Audi pursuing the self-driving agenda, there’s little talk on self-driving ...


New Zealand | 31 August 2016
Stolen herd of dairy cows would cost at least $1m

The theft of 500 dairy cows worth $1 million is no joke and if it had been a bank robbed of this amount there would be a big fuss, says Federated Farmers. Dairy chairman Andrew Hoggard said the the...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed


Top stories you may have missed
FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A new survey has revealed that the vast majority of British consumers belie...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The British public are overwhelmingly in favour of keeping or strengthening...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The sustained recovery of pig prices since the spring has come at a time wh...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A World Trade Organisation (WTO) panel has declared the Russian import ban ...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A new study has linked oilseed rape crops grown from neonicotinoid-treated ...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Philip Hammond is to guarantee billions of pounds of UK government investme...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Access to the foreign labour market is 'critical', according the chief exec...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The Tenant Farmers Association has said the National Trust's vision for a p...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Ulster farmers will 'not lie down and wave the white flag' when Brexit nego...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The cost of rural crime to the UK economy costs £42.5 million a year, accor...


closeicon
Username
Password