Auto Trader Ltd
Farminguk
01 May 2016 | Online since 2003
Rowett Insurance Broking Ltd


30 July 2014 05:29:31|News,Produce,Supermarkets

Country of origin of foods study published


The Food Standards Agency is today publishing the results of a study to look at the origin of foods claiming to be from the UK and Ireland. The study did not identify any cases of food on sale with misleading country of origin claims.
The study which used a screening technique known as stable isotope ratio analysis (SIRA) followed up with investigating traceability documentation. It examined 96 food samples (beef, pork, lamb, apple juice, tomatoes and honey) claimed to be from the UK, or from the Republic of Ireland. Samples were taken from mid-December 2013 to early January 2014.
Andrew Rhodes, Chief Operating Officer at the FSA, said: 'It’s vital that consumers are provided with a true picture as to where the food they buy comes from. If it says it’s produce from the UK then it should be. We wanted, in this study, to check whether people were receiving accurate information on the origin of their food and the results are reassuring for consumers and businesses.
'We also wanted to gain experience of using the relatively new SIRA technology as a tool to show the country of origin of foodstuffs. We found SIRA effective in raising questions about where a food comes from but we relied on traceability information to further investigate origin.
'Defra and the FSA are continuing to work with the research community and industry to improve our ability to test the origin of foods and we look to build on this useful piece of work in the months ahead.'
The samples were mostly taken from retail or wholesale outlets, although four samples of raw beef burgers were obtained from caterers. The samples were not fully representative of the market, but, within the limitations of a small study, provided a reasonable spread across retailers and across the four countries of the UK. Samples were taken from both top end food ranges and economy ranges.
Of the 96 samples screened using SIRA, 78 were shown immediately to be consistent with the origin claimed and 18 were identified for follow-up investigation. Traceability and other evidence were requested for 17 of these samples. In all 17 cases the evidence supplied supported the country of origin claim.
For food law authorities it is very valuable to have a screening test that can help target investigation. SIRA has been shown to have real potential. For some foods it is already a realistic possibility for enforcement authorities to use SIRA screening, although for others some further development would be beneficial.

Download





0 Comment


Name

Please enter your name


Email

Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment submitted successfully.Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment

World News

United Kingdom | 29 April 2016
Banned pesticides 'not equally harmful' to bees

The largest field study so far in to the group of pesticides called "neonicotinoids" has concluded that each acts differently on the brains of the bees. One of the chemicals widely considered as be...


Canada | 29 April 2016
Competing ethical meat standards leave Alberta beef farmers in crossfire

Colleen Biggs and her husband, Dylan, own an award-winning livestock operation in Alberta. TK Ranch produces beef without antibiotics, drugs, added hormones, animal by-products and chemical insecticid...


India | 29 April 2016
Govt plans to use quarter of farmland for horticulture

In a bid to gain from Haryana's close proximity to the national capital, the state government has planned to use major chunks of agriculture land for horticulture in the state. The state governmen...


Austria | 29 April 2016
Negative effect on Austrian agriculture

The trade agreement between the US and Europe, TTIP, will have negative effects on employment and the biggest losses in jobs will be in the agricultural and food producing sectors. This is one of ...


New Zealand | 29 April 2016
Suicide concerns rise for farmers as dairy downturn takes its toll

A rise in substance abuse and domestic violence in Golden Bay's rural community raises concerns over suicide as the dairy downturn continues to bite, mental health workers say. Community Mental Hea...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed

Farms and Land for sale


Holiday Rentals search



Top stories you may have missed
Username
Password