Auto Trader Ltd
Farminguk
29 April 2016 | Online since 2003
Rowett Insurance Broking Ltd


22 May 2014 06:08:38|Meat Processing,News,Supermarkets

Gloucestershire farmers launch meat traceability scheme


Two Gloucestershire farmers, Clifford Freeman and Matthew Rymer, have ignited a growing ‘Happerley Farmed’ movement among producers, butchers and chefs to achieve transparency in meat sourcing and production.
On Friday 23 May, at a country pub on the banks of The River Severn, farmers, butchers and local restauranteurs will be treated to the first ever cuts of Gloucester Born Beef, from pedigree Gloucester Cattle born reared, slaughtered, butchered and sold all within six miles of Gloucester’s Severn.
Every cut of Gloucester Born Beef will carry a Happerley code tracing it back to the producer and life story of the animal in an instant using web, app and QR technology.
The enterprise is not simply designed to save the Gloucester rare breed but to also demonstrate a successful blueprint for a truly independent meat traceability scheme.
‘Happerley’ connects the producer and animal directly to the consumer so they know in an instant: Who reared it? How was it reared? What breed is it? Where and when was it slaughtered? How was it slaughtered? Who butchered it? How far has it travelled?
Matthew Rymer explains: “We all believe Happerley has the potential to reduce meat fraud, increase premium meat consumption, improve animal welfare and local sourcing, and return confidence to the consumer.
“Too many people I know are turning largely vegetarian because they simply do not trust the smoke and mirrors of the meat industry. This producer led scheme has the potential to create the revolution in genuine traceability we all want.”

Download





0 Comment


Name

Please enter your name


Email

Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment submitted successfully.Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment

World News

United Kingdom | 29 April 2016
Banned pesticides 'not equally harmful' to bees

The largest field study so far in to the group of pesticides called "neonicotinoids" has concluded that each acts differently on the brains of the bees. One of the chemicals widely considered as be...


Canada | 29 April 2016
Competing ethical meat standards leave Alberta beef farmers in crossfire

Colleen Biggs and her husband, Dylan, own an award-winning livestock operation in Alberta. TK Ranch produces beef without antibiotics, drugs, added hormones, animal by-products and chemical insecticid...


India | 29 April 2016
Govt plans to use quarter of farmland for horticulture

In a bid to gain from Haryana's close proximity to the national capital, the state government has planned to use major chunks of agriculture land for horticulture in the state. The state governmen...


Austria | 29 April 2016
Negative effect on Austrian agriculture

The trade agreement between the US and Europe, TTIP, will have negative effects on employment and the biggest losses in jobs will be in the agricultural and food producing sectors. This is one of ...


New Zealand | 29 April 2016
Suicide concerns rise for farmers as dairy downturn takes its toll

A rise in substance abuse and domestic violence in Golden Bay's rural community raises concerns over suicide as the dairy downturn continues to bite, mental health workers say. Community Mental Hea...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed

Farms and Land for sale


Holiday Rentals search



Top stories you may have missed
Username
Password