Mole Valley Farmers
Farminguk
29 August 2016 | Online since 2003
Scrutton Bland


26 May 2014 02:24:37 |Cattle,News

Improved signalling needed after volatile beef prices


Beef farmers looking for clear signals on future trade requirements. The significant drop in beef prices has NFU Scotland to write to Scotland’s abattoirs, asking for improved signalling on likely market needs in a bid to minimise price volatility in the future.
In a letter to the Scottish Association of Meat Wholesalers, the Union has requested that the Association work with beef producers by bringing forward clear messages on the desired carcase specifications needed and likely market requirements going forward.
A more strategic approach to the beef sector will be highly valuable as new CAP support arrangements from 2015 onwards are likely to place more pressure on those rearing and finishing beef cattle.
By working with farmers, NFU Scotland believes the Scottish meat trade would send out a valuable confidence boost at a crucial time for the sector.
NFU Scotland President Nigel Miller said: “While producers can live with an element of volatility, we need to work hard to make sure that there is no repeat of the dramatic downward swing in the beef price being endured just now. Based on retailer requirements, clear messages on the number and specification of carcases needed by processors at an early stage can help deliver greater stability to all parties.
“We fully accept that any guidance from the meat trade would be subject to change in difficult market conditions but I believe clearer signals will be of value to producers in managing both feeding and marketing strategies on farm as we look forward to 2015 and beyond.
“We have asked QMS to look at how Scotland’s cattle kill profile has changed and whether that is contributing to price pressure. The national focus on spring calving and perhaps an increasing number of young bulls being produced by suckler herds may be factors that are exerting a level of pressure on the traditional pattern of prime cattle supplies at this time.
“If these core herd management factors are contributing to the current situation, then farmers can recognise it and look at ways of smoothing that peak of production.
“Producers are also acutely aware of the impact of the reduced Scottish herd and the challenges of maintaining the throughput of Scottish cattle at Scottish plants at certain periods of the year. Clearly English and some Irish cattle fill that gap in supply.
“In the present market conditions, with prices still moving down, the Scottish premium over Irish prime stock is closing and finished stock are reported to be standing on some Scottish farms.
“That means both breeders and key finishers are making tough decisions. The CAP support system post 2015 will be challenging for many beef producers and the market is now key to the future and will drive decision making.
“A continued strong commitment from Scottish processors to Scottish production and a positive operating environment is important to stabilise the market and bolster confidence.”

Download

0 Comment

loginuserlogo
Name

Please enter your name


Email

Please enter your email

Please enter valid email


Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment has been submitted successfully. Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment


Canada | 26 August 2016
Canadian beef exports to EU in limbo over E. coli dispute

If differences of opinion over food safety practices are not resolved, the big promises of a new European market for Canadian beef may be a pipe dream. The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreemen...


India | 26 August 2016
GM mustard clears hurdle in India but more remain

A government panel has cleared commercial use of what would be India's first genetically modified (GM) food crop, but politicians still have to give final approvals amid wide-spread public opposition....


USA | 26 August 2016
USDA buys $20 million in cheese from dairy farms

Moving to bolster dairy farmers who are struggling to cope with price declines, the Agriculture Department announced Tuesday it is spending $20 million - on 11 million pounds of cheese. A taxpayer ...


France | 26 August 2016
Lactalis talks with French milk producers end with no deal

A meeting between Europe's largest dairy group Lactalis and French milk producers requesting a rise in prices ended in a deadlock after 10 hours of negotiations, sources close to the talks said. ...


USA | 26 August 2016
California farmers turn to sewers for water

California's prolonged drought is forcing Central Valley farmers to scramble for water to irrigate crops. They have to be creative. One agency is even turning to a sewage plant to meet demand. Just...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed


Top stories you may have missed
FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A new survey has revealed that the vast majority of British consumers belie...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The British public are overwhelmingly in favour of keeping or strengthening...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The sustained recovery of pig prices since the spring has come at a time wh...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A World Trade Organisation (WTO) panel has declared the Russian import ban ...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A new study has linked oilseed rape crops grown from neonicotinoid-treated ...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Philip Hammond is to guarantee billions of pounds of UK government investme...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Access to the foreign labour market is 'critical', according the chief exec...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The Tenant Farmers Association has said the National Trust's vision for a p...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Ulster farmers will 'not lie down and wave the white flag' when Brexit nego...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The cost of rural crime to the UK economy costs £42.5 million a year, accor...


closeicon
Username
Password