Auto Trader Ltd
Farminguk
30 June 2016 | Online since 2003
Briefing Media - FG Classified


5 May 2014 02:29:55|Animal Health,Cattle,News

Lungworm immunity could be developed without vaccine


Farmers unable to obtain lungworm vaccine for young cattle this spring are being assured that some strategic worming options can allow the development of natural immunity to minimise the risk of clinical disease outbreaks. Zoetis vet Andrew Montgomery says programmes that allow controlled exposure to worms will enable immunity development.
"One option taken by some farmers already is season-long protection from a single long acting moxidectin treatment," he says.
"The active ingredient is distributed through the bloodstream, so worm larvae need to penetrate the gut wall, thereby stimulating an immune response, before being exposed to the wormer and killed."
Another option, according to Mr Montgomery, is the Autoworm First Grazer pulse-release oxfendazole bolus. At three-week intervals, a dose of wormer is released, killing all the common worms, including lungworm, that cattle may be carrying.
The active ingredient has no residual action so cattle are exposed to worm challenge during each 21 day interval between wormer pulses, thereby stimulating an immune response.
Cattle not yet treated with either pulse-release bolus or long acting wormer can also still be protected throughout the grazing season with a strategic 0.5% moxidectin pour-on regime.
“This treatment offers protection against gastrointestinal worms and lungworm with an eight to 10 week dosing interval," the Zoetis vet explains.
"So one treatment now, another in about two months time, then one up to five weeks pre-housing can provide a worm control protocol for the entire grazing season.
"As well as immunity generated by larvae penetrating the gut wall before being exposed to wormer carried in the blood, the intervals between treatments allow additional exposure to worm larvae for further stimulation of immunity. But before this causes disease, the next treatment kills the larvae."

Download



0 Comment


Name

Please enter your name


Email

Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment submitted successfully.Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment


Australia | 30 June 2016
Climate change forces European graziers to consider Aussie cattle

Rising temperatures and variable weather patterns caused by climate change will lead to a growing demand for tropical varieties of cattle in Europe, according to a German breeder. Sylvia Opitz and ...


USA | 30 June 2016
U.S. cattle auction halts activity in blow to producers, traders

Organizers of an online U.S. cattle auction that ranchers and traders had hoped would help restore transparency to livestock pricing nationwide said on Wednesday they would suspend activity indefinite...


USA | 30 June 2016
West Texas A&M's cloned cattle could beef up industry

West Texas A&M University researchers on Wednesday announced positive results in their quest to use cloning to consistently produce high-quality beef — and more of it per animal. A U.S. Department ...


Germany | 30 June 2016
'Cancer causing' weedkiller given go ahead by EU - as Germany and France hold it to ransom

Farmers across the bloc can continue using glyphosate for another 18 months after European health commissioner Vytenis Andriukaitis yesterday extended its licence before a June 30 deadline. The her...


Australia | 30 June 2016
Fonterra cut another blow to dairy farmers

The latest price cut from a major dairy producer could force some Australian farmers out of the industry as they struggle to break even. Fonterra Australia has joined Murray Goulburn and Bega Chees...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed

Farms and Land for sale

PropertyLocation
PropertyAgent
PropertyMinimumPrice
PropertyMaximumPrice
PropertyCategory

Holiday Rentals search

AccommodationKeyword
AccommodationType
AccommodationCounty
AccommodationStarRating


Top stories you may have missed
closeicon
Username
Password