Agri-Shop Ltd
23 October 2016 | Online since 2003
Auto Trader Ltd

FarmingUK Logo
12 February 2014 10:58:54 |Meat Processing,News

MEPs call for stronger measures to boost food safety

New legislation to tackle outbreaks of animal diseases, such as African swine fever, more effectively, restrict the introduction of dangerous new pests and enable the EU to act quickly but responsibly in emergencies was adopted by the agriculture committee in two separate votes on Tuesday.
MEPs increased the emphasis on prevention, for example with better animal husbandry and use of veterinary medicines, and tightened the rules on importing plant products thatcould pose a risk to public health in the EU.

The new rules should help EU countries and animal and plant operators tackle dangerous animal diseases and the higher influx of pests stemming from increased trade and climate change. The two regulations approved on Tuesday, on animal diseases and pests respectively, merge some 50 pieces of legislation and update them to take on board recent scientific and technological advances.
The new rules clarify the duties of farmers, traders and animal professionals, including veterinarians and pet keepers, to ensure the good health of their animals and prevent the introduction and spread of diseases.
However, more focus needs to be placed on prevention, the agriculture committee said. To boost good animal husbandry and the proper use of veterinary medicines, MEPs proposed that member states should pay particular attention to antimicrobial resistance and ensure better access to professional training in this area when designing their national plans for the prevention and control of infectious animal diseases.
For instance, veterinarians must provide proper explanations to farmers, traders and pet keepers of how to use antimicrobials responsibly. The adopted text also says animal operators should be subject to animal-health visits by a veterinarian to their premises with the aim of stopping emerging diseases from spreading through the EU market.
Urgent measures with proper scrutiny
To tackle diseases that have a major impact on public health, agricultural production or animal welfare and health, such as Bluetongue, African swine fever or Avian influenza, the Commission must be empowered to adopt urgent measures, MEPs say. But they insist that both Parliament and Council must have proper scrutiny over the measures adopted and the possibility of repealing them if necessary.
Member states should set up mandatory registration schemes for stray animals, which are often responsible for transmitting animal diseases, by January 2018, say MEPs. They also suggest that the Commission could table a proposal concerning electronic databases for stray dogs throughout the EU by 31 July 2019.

In a separate vote on measures to protect plants from pests, the agriculture committee proposed a complete overhaul of the current approach towards imports of plants and plant products from non-EU countries in order to make preventive measures more effective.
Contrary to the Commission's proposal to keep the black list of plants and plant products from certain countries or regions, the approach favoured also by the rapporteur, Hynek Fajmon (ECR, CZ), the committee voted to establish a positive list, i.e. a list of countries and products that do not pose an unacceptable danger to EU agriculture and may therefore be imported into the EU.
Countries wishing to export plants to the EU should submit a request to the Commission, which should decide whether or not to accept it on the basis of various checks, including on-the-spot audits by the EU, says the committee.

The draft legislation on the prevention and control of animal diseases, being steered through Parliament by Marit Paulsen (ALDE, SE), was adopted by 31 votes to 6, with 3 abstentions.
The draft legislation on protective measures against plant pests, being steered through Parliament by Hynek Fajmon (ECR, CZ), was adopted by 24 votes to 11, with two abstentions.
Both texts will be scrutinised by the full House at the March or April plenary session.


0 Comment


Please enter your name


Please enter your email

Please enter valid email


Please enter your comment

Post Comment

Your comment has been submitted successfully. Please wait for admin approval.


No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment

Australia | 21 October 2016
Local bloc seeks to counter bid for Australian cattle empire

Nationalist lawmakers have teamed up with local ranchers to try to counter a bid involving Chinese buyers for the S. Kidman & Co. cattle empire, in what would be one of Australia’s biggest agribusines...

USA | 21 October 2016
Arizona farmers give back by donating milk to food banks

43 million gallons of milk have been dumped in fields across the country since the start of the year. That's why many American farmers have been forced to do with lower milk prices not bringing in...

USA | 21 October 2016
Your groceries may be cheaper, but farmers and supermarkets feel the pain

If you’re just a little irked that gasoline prices have edged up recently, maybe this will cheer you up: Groceries are a bargain. Average supermarket prices fell 2.2% in September from a year ago, ...

Canada | 21 October 2016
Farmers fail to rally to tax revolt talk

If farmland property taxes are too high, don’t pay them. That’s what Dugald farmer Edgar Scheurer suggested while commenting on Facebook about Manitoba Co-operator stories on skyrocketing farmland ...

United Kingdom | 21 October 2016
Woman killed in cattle attack on family farm

A woman has been killed after she was attacked by cattle on a family farm in Co Derry. The pensioner, who has been named locally as Brigid McKeefry and is aged in her 70s, was rushed to the Causewa...

Trending Now


Top stories you may have missed