HROC (agency) - Kubota
Farminguk
25 September 2016 | Online since 2003
Scrutton Bland


26 February 2014 06:53:34 |News,Poultry,Shows and Events

National Conference to focus on goose management


NFU Scotland is holding a two-day conference on Islay which will focus on the management of wild geese in Scotland.
The conference, chaired by Ken Rundle of SRUC, will see a range of speakers including the Union’s President Nigel Miller and Deputy Director of Policy Andrew Bauer.
Since the 1970s, there has been a steady increase in goose numbers of some species in parts of Scotland, particularly around the remote and fragile islands and coastal areas. Farmers and crofters in these areas are seeing a significant increase in damage to farmland as a result of growing goose populations and are having to adjust their farming activity to cope.
There will be farm visits on Monday March 10, including to the RSPB Wildlife Reserve at Loch Gruinart.
On Tuesday March 11, the conference at the Ionaid Chaluim Chille Ile (Columba Centre) will cover a range of topics including the challenges set by farming with both protected and quarry species of geese across Scotland.
Also on the bill is Paul Walton, Head of Habitats and Species at the RSPB who will speak about meeting the UK’s nature conservation objectives; David Stroud, Senior Ornithological Adviser Joint Nature Conservation Council and Alyn Walsh National Parks and Wildlife Service in Ireland, amongst others from the industry.
The afternoon will feature workshops for attendees focussing on co-existence of protected species alongside farming as well as the impact of quarry species of geese.
Nigel Miller, president of NFU Scotland who will be speaking at the event, commented:
“This is an important event for not only Islay, but many other areas which have been affected by the increase in the goose population. The lessons learnt and the experience gained on Islay will have a real spin off benefit for other regions.
“From the two-day conference we aim to re-examine the Scottish Government’s policy objectives on goose management and ensure there is a viable future for agricultural businesses which are affected by geese in the Highlands and Islands and other areas of Scotland.
“The future changes to the Common Agricultural Policy will have a significant impact on farmers in these fragile areas. The habitat that has been built by farmers may become damaged if wildlife populations, like geese, are not managed. We need to ensure there is support in place to help farmers cope with growing goose populations.”

Download

0 Comment

loginuserlogo
Name

Please enter your name


Email

Please enter your email

Please enter valid email


Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment has been submitted successfully. Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment


Ireland | 23 September 2016
Farmers who left safety net of EU subsidies to make fortune

Irish farmers have proved that they don't need subsidies from the EU to be massively successful in their chosen profession. Some have chosen to leave the payment safety net behind and seek their fortu...


China | 23 September 2016
China lays groundwork to be major producer of GMO crops

China has a fifth of the world’s population, but only about 7 percent of its arable land. Farming plus safe and healthy foods are national obsessions. So it came as no surprise that government-own...


USA | 23 September 2016
Drought grips parts of South, parches ground, withers crops

Extreme drought conditions are persisting in parts of Alabama and Georgia, wilting crops and raising the specter of wildfires. Thursday's U.S. Drought Monitor, a weekly report that tracks drought c...


China | 23 September 2016
China to reopen beef market to American producers after 13 years

American beef producers are expected get access to China for the first time in 13 years, raising the possibility that the U.S. could recapture lost market share in one of the fastest-growing global ma...


Australia | 23 September 2016
Greener pastures: the dairy farmers committed to sustainability

It was a soil bacteria course in New Zealand that convinced Reggie Davis to change his farming methods. The fourth-generation Victorian dairy farmer had become increasingly concerned by the costs, ...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed


Top stories you may have missed
FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A herd of rare White Park cattle could die out if its owners do not urgentl...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The UK government is "failing" to support farmers in the long-term accordin...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Retailer Co-op has announced that from May 2017 all of its bacon and lamb w...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Over 50 wildlife organisations have compiled a stock-take of all the UK's n...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

In the run up to the EU farm ministers meeting the agricultural sector have...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The RPA must iron out a number of problems that still exist with 2015 BPS p...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Tourism businesses in the countryside are being held back due to the uncert...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A 24 point action plan aimed at revitalising Scotland's sheep sector after ...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A new survey has revealed that the vast majority of British consumers belie...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The British public are overwhelmingly in favour of keeping or strengthening...


closeicon
Username
Password