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3 April 2014 11:12:46|News

New EAMU’s in leeks and salad onions for Dow Shield 400


Dow Shield 400 now has an Extension of Authorisation for minor use (EAMU) for weed control in outdoor leeks and outdoor salad onions. The Dow AgroSciences’ Hotline has received a number of calls about this EAMU from growers and agronomists, all seeing a good fit in these crops to control weeds, such as mayweeds and groundsel.
The new EAMUs for Dow Shield 400 are for use in outdoor leeks and salad onions, with a Maximum Individual Dose of 350 ml/ha and a Maximum Total Individual Dose of 525 ml/ha. It can be used from the 1st March to the 31st August.
Dow Shield 400 is an effective herbicide for the control of difficult perennial and annual weeds. It controls creeping thistles, volunteer potatoes and a range of annual broad-leaved weeds including corn marigold, groundsel, mayweeds and smooth sow-thistle. It has label recommendations for a wide range of crops including sugar beet, oilseed rape, grassland, wheat, barley, linseed and forage maize and a plethora of EAMUs. For any EAMU, growers should obtain a copy of the notice of approval via the Chemicals Regulation Directorate (CRD) web site, ADAS offices or NFU. In the EAMU notice of approval, CRD point out that liability lies with the user and growers are advised to test a small area of crop prior to commercial use.
“For less frequent users, it is worth reminding growers that the Dow Shield formulation has changed from a 200 g/l one to a 400 g/l. The more concentrated formulation has the same weed control efficacy, the same crop selectivity and the same excellent compatibilities with other products. Growers benefit from fewer packs to open, to rinse and clean, contributing to a much quicker and simpler turnaround. The Dow Shield 400 pack has self-seal cap technology and no induction seal, so there is no aluminium induction foil to open and get rid of, making the spraying process more efficient and pack disposal easier and quicker,” says David Roberts of Dow AgroSciences.

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