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26 August 2016 | Online since 2003
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7 August 2014 10:43:29 |News,Shows and Events

Plymouth academic to address global aquaculture conferences in China


Professor Simon Davies

Professor Simon Davies

A world-leading aquaculture expert will represent Plymouth University at two major conferences examining the future of the global food industry.
Professor Simon Davies, Chair in Aquaculture Nutrition in the University’s School of Biological Sciences, will be among the keynote speakers at Aquatic China 2014 taking place in Beijing in September.
He will then also be among the senior delegates at VIV China 2014, which is supported by the Dutch government and is one of the biggest global gatherings of researchers, suppliers and buyers in the international aquafeed industry.
China is the biggest global producer in aquaculture, a field which includes fish and shellfish farming and is presently the fastest growing method of food production worldwide.
Professor Davies said: “The aquaculture industry is worth around $130billion, and Asia is responsible for around 70 per cent of global fish production. From that, China farms more fish than all the other countries put together, so these two conferences will attract the leading figures in the field worldwide. To be invited to attend is a demonstration of our standing in global aquaculture research, and a recognition that the work of my team here in Plymouth is making a difference across the world.”
Professor Davies has been one of the leading figures in aquaculture since joining Plymouth University almost 30 years ago, and is the Editor-in-Chief of International Aquafeed, the leading trade magazine for the fish feeding and aquatic animal health sector.
He has produced numerous scientific research papers and earned several major grant awards, while his recent collaborations include being the only academic outside Scotland to contribute to the Scottish Government’s new Marine Scotland 2020 strategy.
He added: “Although we have traditionally farmed in fresh water settings for years, the oceans are the last frontier on the planet which we can expand into for food production. The research we are conducting in Plymouth has examined the potential nutritional requirements and assessment of natural feed ingredients for these ocean-farmed fish, to ensure their health and wellbeing is maintained as well as keeping quality high. It will also ensure the end product we eat can be healthy, safe and sustainable for future generations.”
Aquatic China 2014 is being held at the Kuntai Hotel in Beijing on September 21 and 22, with VIV China taking place in the city’s New China International Exhibition Center (NCIEC) from September 23-25.

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