03 March 2015 | Online since 2003



10 July 2014|Arable,Cereal,Crops,News

Season extension to boost beet


Lincolnshire sugar beet grower and contractor, Richard Ivatt, has completed the first stage of his fungicide programme this week, with an application of Spyrale across all 130 hectares of his own crop, based at Shillakers Farm, near Spalding.

The plan is to follow-up with a second Spyrale application in around five weeks, with the timing adjusted depending on disease pressure. Any crop destined for later lifting, essentially into the New Year, will most likely get a third fungicide treatment as well this season.

It’s a programme Richard has proven to work well, and advocates on the further 100 hectares he looks after on contract - along with any crop that makes up a total of around 1100 hectares he lifts over the harvesting season.

“The benefits of effective disease control have become even more apparent as we have moved to ‘just-in-time’ lifting for a longer beet campaign,” he says. “With beet in the ground for longer, better green leaf retention has allowed it continue putting on yield right through the autumn and winter.

“Last season the highest sugar levels were recorded from beet lifted in February, where crop left for late lifting on the light gravel-based land really benefitted from the mild conditions.”

With the longer growing season he highlights that retention of healthy green leaf is also crucial for frost protection and to help harvesting, as well as driving yield. “British Sugar is urging us to micro-top so as not to cut into the crown, but they don’t want any leaf material going into the factory.

“That is virtually impossible if you have dead rubbery leaves on the plant that wrap around the scalper knife. We can achieve a much more consistent, cleaner top and improved root quality with a healthy upright green leaf.” Richard says it is abundantly clear to the harvester operator which crops have had a two or three spray fungicide treatment.

Furthermore, the green leaf offers valuable frost protection for later lifted beet, he reports. Generally Richard aims to lift the heavier fen land first, followed by low-lying blackland fen that tends to be more susceptible to frost damage.

“Where we used the three-spray fungicide programme in 2010, we didn’t experience the severe losses encountered on unprotected beet when early frosts hit in November. We certainly find that green-leaved beet will stand one bout of frost and continue growing through the winter, although a second frost will still tend to stop it.”

He believes that the advances in varieties, agronomy, weather conditions and the longer growing season has extended the opportunities to grow beet on lighter land. Even if there is a dry period through the summer, he argues that there is generally still ample time for healthy beet to put on yield and sugar levels later in the season. “We used to struggle to reliably yield 40 to 50 t/ha on some of the lighter land,” he recalls. “Last year the vast majority exceeded the target yield of 70 t/ha, and with good sugar levels.”

Richard adds that this season’s first Spyrale fungicide treatment will include a tank-mix of four kilos of bitter salts and two litres of soluble manganese to enhance crop health; with increased rates of salts and manganese on the lighter gravel land. “Even though the crop was late drilled and the seedbeds suffered from no frost mould over the winter, the crop looks exceptionally well. We now just have to keep it clean for the rest of the season to get the full benefit.”

Disease risk

Syngenta Field Technical Manager, Simon Roberts, highlights reports from the BBRO that rust has started to be identified in East Anglian sugar beet crops, with risks escalating in hot, dry conditions. Furthermore, previously wet weather in recent weeks would have primed conditions for Powdery Mildew, which could be triggered by summer storms or irrigation.

“Trials have repeatedly shown the importance of proactive treatments to prevent disease getting established in beet crops,” he advises. “It is essential that growers don’t neglect sugar beet crops during busy cereal harvest periods. With most crops reaching full canopy, it will be essential to make timely applications of Spyrale and Priori Xtra as soon as any disease is seen or conditions pose a high risk.”

Simon points out that the broad-spectrum disease control of Spyrale is especially valuable with the trend for variable weather conditions, including periods of prolonged dry weather interspersed with heavy storms, which is highly conducive to all sugar beet diseases. Priori Xtra also offers excellent alternative broad-spectrum disease control, along with additional strobilurin greening effects for plant health and leaf retention.

Download



Comments


No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment

To post comment without approval login or register

Display name

Please enter your name

Email (optional)
Comment

Please enter your comment

Post Comment

Your comment submitted successfully.Please wait for admin approval.

Some error on your process.Please try one more time.



Jobs


1 March 2015
Chef de Partie
We are The Methuen Arms, an ambitious destination food driven business. Nose to tail menu design, whole animal, in house butc...

11 February 2015
Sales / Business Development Manager - Software & Systems
Our client is the UK market leader in the supply of Integrated Dealer Management Systems for Agriculture, Horticulture, Groun...

19 February 2015
Band 5 Staff Nurse - Surgery and Associated Services
Chase Farm Hospital - Assessment Centre Date:. It comprises Barnet Hospital, Chase Farm Hospital, the Royal Free Hospital and...

27 February 2015
National Account Manager
The right person will have proven sales skills in a customer driven environment, experience - preferably selling premium prod...

26 February 2015
IFA Support Administrator
This heads down role will involve new business processing, compliance preparation, dairy management and general administratio...




Top stories you may have missed
2 February 2015 | Arable
Is EU membership damaging UK farming?

Is EU membership damaging UK farming?

Membership of the EU is damaging the British farming industry, according to...


29 January 2015 | Machinery and Equipment
Drones 'rapidly changing' agriculture

Drones 'rapidly changing' agriculture

BASIS has launched an accreditation for pilots of Unmanned Aerial Systems (...


23 January 2015 | Arable
UK wheat yields have potential to double

UK wheat yields have potential to double

UK wheat yields have theoretical potential to more than double over the nex...


23 January 2015 | Machinery and Equipment
Crowds flock to LAMMA 2015

Crowds flock to LAMMA 2015

Britain’s farmers flocked to Peterborough for the first day of LAMMA’15 to ...


22 January 2015 | Cattle
Don't blame supermarkets for milk crisis...

Don't blame supermarkets for milk crisis...

The crisis in the dairy industry is not the fault of supermarkets, accordin...


16 January 2015 | CLA
Families affected by HS2 face 'major wor...

Families affected by HS2 face 'major wor...

Transport Minister Baroness Kramer visited three rural businesses in Cheshi...


16 January 2015 | Machinery and Equipment
John Deere unveil new 6R tractor range

John Deere unveil new 6R tractor range

Spearheading the John Deere range of mid-size tractors from Mannheim, the n...


14 January 2015 | Animal Health
Monthly TB checks more effective than ba...

Monthly TB checks more effective than ba...

Regular testing for bovine TB could significantly reduce the number of infe...


12 January 2015 | News
Government regulations hampering UK agri...

Government regulations hampering UK agri...

Single-issue policy-making threatens to hamper, not help, the progress of U...


8 January 2015 | Cattle
2015: The year ahead for the beef market

2015: The year ahead for the beef market

2014 has been a “rocky old year” for the beef industry but better prices ar...