Agri-Shop Ltd
Farminguk
26 August 2016 | Online since 2003
OvoConcept


6 January 2014 14:46:53 |News,Sheep

The impact of extreme weather this winter on coccidiosis in lambs


If you have been following the long range weather forecasts in the news lately, you would have seen the tabloid papers warning about this winter being the ?worst for more than 60 years?, bringing arctic conditions until next spring. As lambing season approaches, you might be considering housing your flock earlier or for longer than planned with such hazardous weather on the way. However, prolonged housing can increase the risk of other diseases too, including coccidiosis.
Caused by the parasite Eimeria, coccidiosis is a widespread disease in lambs. Eimeria is found almost everywhere in the environment and most animals would have been exposed to it early on in life. So why is it worth thinking about this winter?
Normally, a healthy lamb in contact with low levels of Eimeria will develop an immune response to protect them from getting the disease in the future. However during a stressful time such as housing due to bad weather, the lamb?s immunity can become compromised and the numbers of infective oocysts in the environment can increase without the animal being able to fight them off effectively. The most susceptible ages are lambs four to six weeks post weaning and signs of disease range from stunted growth and poor weight gain, to full blown diarrhoea and dehydration. So what can you do to protect against it, without compromising development of the lambs? natural immunity?
Lambs housed in overcrowded or unhygienic conditions can often spread disease quickly between different age groups, particularly older livestock to younger ?it?s often these older lambs that excrete very high levels of infective oocysts, compared to immune adult animals that only excrete at very low levels. Farmers are advised to keep pens and feed troughs clean and treat for coccidiosis with an effective product such as diclazuril (Vecoxan® 2.5mg/ml Oral Suspension). Given as a single dose, Vecoxan® allows natural immunity to develop while reducing oocyst (parasite) spread in the environment. There are two treatment options available, early or metaphylactically. Early treatment is advised as soon as any sign of disease is noticed and all animals should be batch treated. The second option is recommended for farms with a history of coccidiosis, after a known stress trigger has occurred such as housing. Treatment should be given 14 days after the incident, before any sign of diarrhoea occurs. Prolonged housing may mean that the anticipated pattern changes, so farmers should be alert to this possibility.
In a recent study, lambs treated with a single dose of Vecoxan® experienced weight gain increases of 30 grams per day, a shorter fattening period and a feed conversion efficiency improvement of 7%.
Farmers must keep in mind that rapid treatment is only half the battle when it comes to tackling coccidiosis. Proper management at housing by keeping lambs age batched, making sure they are not overcrowded and that pen and feed troughs are clean, can all help reduce the stress and overall spread of coccidiosis.
For further advice, farmers are recommended to speak to their veterinary surgeon or Suitable Qualified Person for more information.

Download

0 Comment

loginuserlogo
Name

Please enter your name


Email

Please enter your email

Please enter valid email


Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment has been submitted successfully. Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment


Canada | 26 August 2016
Canadian beef exports to EU in limbo over E. coli dispute

If differences of opinion over food safety practices are not resolved, the big promises of a new European market for Canadian beef may be a pipe dream. The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreemen...


India | 26 August 2016
GM mustard clears hurdle in India but more remain

A government panel has cleared commercial use of what would be India's first genetically modified (GM) food crop, but politicians still have to give final approvals amid wide-spread public opposition....


USA | 26 August 2016
USDA buys $20 million in cheese from dairy farms

Moving to bolster dairy farmers who are struggling to cope with price declines, the Agriculture Department announced Tuesday it is spending $20 million - on 11 million pounds of cheese. A taxpayer ...


France | 26 August 2016
Lactalis talks with French milk producers end with no deal

A meeting between Europe's largest dairy group Lactalis and French milk producers requesting a rise in prices ended in a deadlock after 10 hours of negotiations, sources close to the talks said. ...


USA | 26 August 2016
California farmers turn to sewers for water

California's prolonged drought is forcing Central Valley farmers to scramble for water to irrigate crops. They have to be creative. One agency is even turning to a sewage plant to meet demand. Just...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed


Top stories you may have missed
FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The British public are overwhelmingly in favour of keeping or strengthening...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The sustained recovery of pig prices since the spring has come at a time wh...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A World Trade Organisation (WTO) panel has declared the Russian import ban ...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A new study has linked oilseed rape crops grown from neonicotinoid-treated ...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Philip Hammond is to guarantee billions of pounds of UK government investme...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Access to the foreign labour market is 'critical', according the chief exec...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The Tenant Farmers Association has said the National Trust's vision for a p...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Ulster farmers will 'not lie down and wave the white flag' when Brexit nego...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The cost of rural crime to the UK economy costs £42.5 million a year, accor...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A young farmers club member from Oxfordshire has created a petition on the ...


closeicon
Username
Password