Mole Valley Farmers
Farminguk
29 September 2016 | Online since 2003
Less co2 Limited


29 January 2014 03:10:56 |Animal Health,News,Pigs

UK pig producers urged to review defences against disease


BPEX has urged pig producers to review biosecurity to protect their herds against devastating diseases, including African Swine Fever (ASF) and Procine Epidemic Diarrhoea (PRED) virus.
PED causes vomiting and diarrhoea especially in nursing piglets, with up to 100% mortality in that age group being reported.
The virus spreads by direct pig contact or indirect exposure through fomites (i.e. objects or substances capable of carrying infectious organisms) which are contaminated with faecal material which contains virus.
A positive case of PED has been confirmed in Canada and was diagnosed in the US in May 2013. It has since spread to 23 states. It is not a food safety issue and it poses no risk to other species, although it is considered a serious health threat to the Canadian industry.
Canadian pork industry stakeholders have worked together to develop contingency plans and to prevent its spread across the border.
ASF has just been confirmed in wild boar within the EU, in Lithuania.
ASF is a particular risk to UK pig producers because it can be carried via affected pig meat products and there is a considerable number of pig farm workers who travel to and from eastern Europe. To alert staff to this risk, producers can order 'Don’t bring it home' posters.
"Key points for good biosecurity include: the isolation of pigs on arrival to the unit, limiting access to vehicles and people, thorough cleaning and disinfection of livestock lorries and arranging an offsite collection point for deadstock collection vehicles. Producers should always ensure that pigs have no access to meat products or products which may have come into contact with meats," BPEX said.
A major outbreak of Porcine Epidemic Diarrhoea in the US is causing losses of 50 to 100% of affected piglets. It has been reported on 200 units in 13 states since May.
It also appears to be spreading. In China more than a million piglets have died in an outbreak which started in October 2010. The virus from the outbreak in the US is said to be 99.4% similar to that from China.
The Chinese outbreak, where the virus has been endemic since 1973 and where vaccination has been widely practiced, suggests that were the new strains from China and/or the US to be introduced to the UK there is a significant risk that the impact of the disease could be severe with mortality rates in piglets of up to 50% to 100%.

Download

0 Comment

loginuserlogo
Name

Please enter your name


Email

Please enter your email

Please enter valid email


Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment has been submitted successfully. Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment


Ireland | 29 September 2016
Irish dairy farmers seek €11m under EU milk reduction scheme

Irish dairy farmers have sought €11m to reduce milk production during the final three months of the year under the European Union’s Voluntary Milk Reduction Scheme. This is according to the Ministe...


USA | 29 September 2016
U.S. cattle prices continue to erode as supplies rise

Rising beef supplies and large supplies of competing proteins are eroding prices on fed cattle headed for slaughter, and market volatility continues to be the focal point of the U.S. market. In the...


USA | 29 September 2016
Farmers suing Syngenta over GMO corn granted class action status in federal court

A federal judge has granted class action status to at least 440,000 farmers accusing agrochemical giant Syngenta of selling genetically modified corn seeds and costing them billions of dollars in lost...


Australia | 29 September 2016
Global dairy prices lift as farmers slash production

Global dairy prices are rising as farmers around the world cut back on production, but local prices are still below the cost of production for many south-east Australian farmers. The previous Globa...


Puerto Rico | 29 September 2016
Puerto Rico Experiences an Agricultural Renaissance

For the first time in nearly 30 years, Puerto Ricans are buying rice, vegetables and traditional crops such as plantains and pineapples, that are produced on the island. As new farms spring across ...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed


Top stories you may have missed
FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Farm subsidy payments funded by the UK taxpayer are being paid to millionai...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Labour will end the badger cull and prioritise ending bovine TB, Shadow Def...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A herd of rare White Park cattle could die out if its owners do not urgentl...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The UK government is "failing" to support farmers in the long-term accordin...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Retailer Co-op has announced that from May 2017 all of its bacon and lamb w...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Over 50 wildlife organisations have compiled a stock-take of all the UK's n...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

In the run up to the EU farm ministers meeting the agricultural sector have...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

The RPA must iron out a number of problems that still exist with 2015 BPS p...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

Tourism businesses in the countryside are being held back due to the uncert...


FarmingUK
FarmingUK Logo

FarmingUK

A 24 point action plan aimed at revitalising Scotland's sheep sector after ...


closeicon
Username
Password