Mole Valley Farmers
Farminguk
30 July 2016 | Online since 2003
Auto Trader Ltd


4 March 2014 06:48:20|Cattle,News,Pigs,Sheep,Shows and Events

Where next for large-scale livestock production?


The potential effects of large-scale livestock systems on animal health and welfare are set to come under the spotlight during a special workshop looking at the future of livestock production.
The British Society of Animal Science will host the special session on large-scale livestock production as part of its 2014 Annual Conference, ‘Planning for Intensification’.
The workshop, which will form part of the society’s two-day event at the University of Nottingham on 29 and 30 April, will examine the latest science behind intensive livestock systems.
Exploring the potential effects on animal health and welfare, expert speakers will discuss system design and the technology and techniques being made use of in large-scale systems.
As part of the conference’s wider aim to examine the role of animal science and technology in global food production, the workshop will also identify areas where more work needs to be done to address concerns over how food is produced.
“In the face of growing world populations, diminishing resources and changing food demands, we have to look at alternative food production systems,” says BSAS chief executive Mike Steele.
“Understandably intensive production raises concerns for many, but it’s important to look behind the emotive arguments to see if we have the technology to address those concerns, and if not what can science do to help overcome them.
“It is right that livestock production systems are properly scrutinised and if we decide large-scale systems are not for us, we need to think about where animal science and technology goes next to help us produce secure, sustainable food.”
The workshop will sit alongside conference presentations from experts from around the world on the latest techniques, technologies and developments in animal science.
Aimed at farmers, vets, researchers and policy-makers, key presentations will focus on how technology is helping in sheep, dairy cattle and poultry production, as well as where science needs to develop to help farm businesses be profitable and productive in 2020.
The event will also host a dedicated session, run in conjunction with EBLEX, looking at improving ewe efficiency through better feeding, with a focus on efficient grass management, wintering diets and the role of good rationing.

Download

0 Comment

loginuserlogo
Name

Please enter your name


Email

Please enter your email

Please enter valid email


Comment

Please enter your comment


Post Comment

Your comment has been submitted successfully. Please wait for admin approval.


Comments

No comments posted yet. Be the first to post a comment


New Zealand | 29 July 2016
Robbery at the Kensington Avenue dairy - Waihi

At 12.50pm today, Thursday 28 July, a man entered the Kensington Avenue dairy in Waihi armed with what appeared to be a pistol. He is described as Maori or Polynesian of solid build who was wearing a ...


France | 29 July 2016
French plans for origin labelling slammed by dairy and meat processors

France is to trial mandatory country of origin labelling for two years. Dairy and meat processors have heavily criticised plans to introduce origin labelling in France. EU Health Commissioner Vy...


Canada | 29 July 2016
Canadians given go-ahead to buy another dairy farm

Canadians are continuing to buy into New Zealand dairy farming with the purchase of a property in the Maniototo, Otago. Last year a report by KPMG showed Canadian investors were the biggest foreign...


Uganda | 29 July 2016
Will tax cuts on agriculture machinery spur sector?

To encourage more people to get into agribusiness, government in the financial year that started on July 1st decided to strike down 18% Value Added Tax (VAT) on the supply of machinery used for the pr...


USA | 29 July 2016
Scientists call for increased federal investment in sustainable agriculture

Based on a new analysis of federal funding from the US Department of Agriculture, researchers say there is an urgent need for increased investment in research and development aimed at making sustainab...



Trending Now

Viewed
Discussed


Top stories you may have missed
closeicon
Username
Password