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20 March 2019 | Online since 2003
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Yew Tree Farm


Property Address: Yew Tree Farm, Manor Park Road, North Rode, Congleton, CW12 2PF

Property Type: B&B

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Cheshire

Enjoy England Four Stars


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Property Description :
Yew Tree is a working farm of 86 acres, located in beautiful unspoilt countryside overlooking the Peak District Hills. Click here for a 360 degree view of North Rode and Yew Tree farm from the church tower.

This is an ideal base from which to visit the Potteries, Alton Towers, the magnificent historic houses of Cheshire and Derbyshire and enjoy the scenic beauty of the Peak District.

Whether for business or pleasure, Yew Tree Farm will provide a relaxing base.

Guests are invited to look around and get to know the farm animals and wide range of pets. There are wonderful walks from the doorstep. Forget everyday pressures. Take a stroll to the lake to see the wildfowl, rest by the pretty stream and explore the woods.

The style is relaxed country cottage with comfortable furnishings and a warm friendly atmosphere. Guests have access at all times and have their own entrance. The residents lounge has a colour television and wireless broadband.

Visitors are requested not to smoke in the house.

The generous breakfast and traditional evening meals are prepared to a high standard using fresh local produce - Yew Tree beef and lamb are constantly on the menu - a true taste of the country! Special diets are also catered for.

Breakfast is served at 8.30 am (earlier by request) and Dinner at 6.30 pm.

There are two en suite bedrooms both tastefully decorated. One is a double room and the second has one double and one single bed. Both rooms have wireless broadband, televisions, clock radios, facilities for hot drinks and are centrally heated.

Evening Meals AvailableServes BreakfastWorking Farm



Property Location :

Things to see and do in Cheshire :


A Taste of Chester Walking Tour
A Taste of Chester Walking Tour


Tantalise your taste buds and indulge your senses on our new walking tour of the city, A Taste of Chester. Combining 2,000 years of fascinating history with samples of local produce from around the region this tour is a great introduction to the delights that Chester and Cheshire have to offer.


Bishop Lloyds Palace
Bishop Lloyds Palace


This fine house was built for George Lloyd D. D., Bishop of Sodor and Man, and also Bishop of Chester 1604 to 1615. Bishop Lloyd died in 1615 and was buried in the Choir of Chester Cathedral. A remarkable survivor of the civil war, the house is located half way down Watergate Street from the Cross on the South side. The Rainforest shop is located in the row level shop. Bishop Lloyd's Palace was originally two town houses built over medieval undercrofts. Rebuilt in the early seventeenth century, the two houses may have become one at this time or, possibly, later in the seventeenth century when major internal alterations took place.


Bramall Hall
Bramall Hall


Bramall Hall is managed by the Arts Culture and Visitor Attractions Service which is part of Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council - contact details as shown above. The Hall has a dedicated professional team to ensure your visit to the Hall is as enjoyable as possible. The guiding staff are all very knowledgeable on the Hall's fascinating history, including the families that have lived here over the centuries. You can either choose to go on one of our popular daily guided tours or guide your self around the Hall with the aid of information boards which can be found in each room.


Cheshire Military Museum
Cheshire Military Museum


An innovative and attractive museum relating the story of the men of the regiments of Cheshire, their families and their community. This 300 year history is told through art, artefacts and memorabilia including fine displays of uniforms, medals and weapons. Access to the archives is available by appointment.


Chester Cathedral
Chester Cathedral


There has been a church on this site for over 1,000 years. Originally a Saxon Minster, then rebuilt as a Benedictine Abbey, this magnificent building is a national treasure in the heart of the city and has been the Cathedral Church of the Diocese of Chester since 1541. From Norman arches to gothic columns, spectacular fourteenth century woodcarvings, the medieval shrine of St. Werburgh and spectacular stained glass. The Cloisters and Church form one of the most complete medieval monastic complexes in the country. Chester Cathedral demonstrates the skills of craftsmen over the centuries and is a place where history has happened. Visitors can take an audio tour, visit the 13th Century Refectory Café and browse the Cathedral Gift Shop, which has a wonderful range of music, jewellery, books, cards, toys, confectionery, gifts and souvenirs for all seasons and occasions.


Chester Zoo
Chester Zoo


Chester Zoo is the UK’s number one charity zoo, with over 7000 animals and 400 different species, including some of the most endangered species on the planet. With more than one million visitors every year, the zoo is an all-year round favourite attraction for everyone The 110-acre Zoo is open all year, except Christmas Day and Boxing Day, from 10am. Car parking is free. Facilities for disabled visitors, including self-drive electric scooters and wheelchairs.


Delamere Forest Park
Delamere Forest Park


Welcome to Delamere Forest, a shady oasis in the midst of the agricultural landscape of the Cheshire Plain. Delamere Forest is Cheshire's largest area of woodland and is a place for families to let off steam, escape the crowds and find peace in the heart of the forest.


Grosvenor Museum
Grosvenor Museum


The Grosvenor Museum is Chester's biggest collection of local and international history. Discover 2000 years of life spread over three floors of a classic 19th century building. Below are a few example of the fascinating attractions just waiting to be discovered. Dazzling Deva Visit the Grosvenor Museum to see the most impressive collection of Roman tombstones, along with fascinating displays that build a picture of Roman Chester. Watch out for the Roman soldiers along the way! There's No Place Like Home And after you have spent time in the museum, visit 20 Castle Street, a town house which takes you back to home life from the 17th century to the 1920s; including Mary in her Victorian kitchen, a Georgian drawing room, a nursery and even a fully fitted Edwardian bathroom! Getting Back to Nature Discover the world of Charles Kingsley, the famous naturalist of Victorian Chester, and explore 'hands-on' the geology and natural history of the area. Amazing Art and Stunning Silver The Grosvenor Museum has some of the finest collections in the North West so enjoy the beauty of the paintings, sculpture and furniture in the Art Gallery, and discover Chester's important place in the history of silver.


Norton Priory
Norton Priory


Norton Priory Museum & Gardens is a fantastic day out, with an award winning museum, excavated medieval ruins, the spectacular St Christopher statue, the lovely Walled Garden and the extensive woodland and sculpture trail. We have a wide ranging events programme throughout the year, with great events and activities for visitors of all ages! Norton Priory is a world class community museum, and we aim to entertain, educate and involve people through our collections, site and gardens. We are also committed to environmental sustainability and in 2006 we received the Gold Award for Green Tourism. Norton Priory also manages Halton Castle, which is open on special days throughout the year.


Old Dee Bridge
Old Dee Bridge


At the end of Bridge Street is the Old Dee Bridge. The oldest bridge in Chester. The first Dee Bridge was built in 922 and was made of wood. Legend says that when King Edward I crossed over on his way to fight the welsh. He decreed that if a stone bridge was not constructed he would sack the city. Fortunately when he returned in 1280. The current bridge was in place. It was known as the Chester Bridge in coaching days when the distances were measured from it.