'Less than 1% of population own half of England's land' leads to calls for new tax

The findings suggest that about 25,000 landowners have control of half of the country's land
The findings suggest that about 25,000 landowners have control of half of the country's land

Labour MPs and campaigners have called for the introduction of Land Value Tax after new data suggested half of England's land is owned by less than 1% of the population.

The findings, unveiled in a new book called 'Who Owns England?', suggest that about 25,000 landowners have control of half of the country's land.

Guy Shrubsole, author of the book, said ownership is 'astonishingly unequal, heavily concentrated in the hands of a tiny elite.'

Major landowners include the Queen, James Dyson, the Duke of Buccleuch, and numerous grouse moor estates.



Labour MPs and Green campaigners have used the statistics to call for the introduction of Land Value Tax, which is paid by landowners on the unimproved rental value of their land.



But the National Farmers' Union (NFU) has warned that by imposing any new land tax on agricultural land 'would simply increase the cost of UK food production with no benefit for shoppers'.

In 2017's Labour's manifesto, the party pledged a review into reforming council tax and business rates and consider new options such as a land value tax, to ensure local government had sustainable funding for the long term.'

Concerns were raised after analysis of the plans, dubbed the garden tax, would eventually be based on three per cent of the value of land for each property.



However, a Labour spokesman dismissed the claims as 'desperate nonsense from the Tories'.

The manifesto contained no details about how the tax would be applied.