Coronavirus: Muller seeks 300 workers as dairy demand soars

There is currently heightened consumer demand for dairy products such as milk, yogurts and butter as a result of Covid-19
There is currently heightened consumer demand for dairy products such as milk, yogurts and butter as a result of Covid-19

Strong consumer demand in dairy products such as fresh milk has led Muller to commence a recruitment push for 300 key workers.

The processor is on the lookout for hundreds of additional workers who will help manufacture and deliver key dairy products.

Demand in items such as yogurt and butter has significantly increased since the UK was put on lockdown as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

To meet this, Muller, which is Britain’s largest producer of branded and private label fresh milk, has raised its total output.



But with demand expected to remain high, and some workers absent due to self isolation, the firm now wants more workers.

There are vacancies UK-wide, ranging from delivery drivers and dairy technicians to factory operators, packaging operatives and garage mechanics.



New employees will be given the appropriate training, depending on experience, as well as a range of employment benefits, Muller said.

Bergen Merey, Chief Executive Officer at Muller Yogurt & Desserts, said they are looking for people with the 'necessary skills and qualifications'.

“Dairy is the cornerstone of Britain’s food industry, so our products and supply chain have a major role to play in helping to feed the nation," he said.

"This is no longer simply a duty, this is now an obligation."

Milk & More, the UKs largest milk grocery delivery service, is also looking to recruit 100 milkmen and women following a record 25,000 new customers in the past week.

It is looking for new recruits to deliver essential food and household items, including eggs, bread, cheese, organic fruit and vegetables, as well as milk in reusable glass bottles.

It comes as farmers and growers still face a substantial shortfall of workers to help pick fruit and vegetables despite a campaign signing up 10,000 people.