Dairy farm denies E.coli outbreak caused by their milk

The farmer who runs the dairy farm said it is 'pure speculation' that his products may have caused the outbreak
The farmer who runs the dairy farm said it is 'pure speculation' that his products may have caused the outbreak

A Yorkshire farmer has denied that his dairy farm is the source of an E.coli outbreak after the council advised customers not to drink his milk.

Darwin's Diary, based near Sheffield, was 'advised' by Barnsley Council to recall its dairy products after 18 people fell ill.

In a statement, the council and Public Health England said this was necessary after a 'potential processing problem was identified with the pasteurisation process'.

But fifth-generation farmer Ben Darwin, who runs the dairy farm, said there is 'no confirmed link or evidence' that his products are linked to the outbreak.



Council officers have visited the Oxspring-based farm but it has not been confirmed as the source of the outbreak.

A total of 18 confirmed or probable cases have been identified this month, mainly in people around the areas of Barnsley, Doncaster or Sheffield.



Nine of these cases are known to have consumed Darwin’s Dairy products before becoming unwell, the council's director of public health, Julia Burrows, said.

Those affected are recovering at home and in hospital.

Ms Burrows said that as a 'precautionary measure' she advised Darwin’s Dairy to recall all milk.

In a post uploaded on the farm's Facebook page, Mr Darwin said the council's decision is 'deeply upsetting' as it is 'pure speculation'.

“I am frustrated that such a statement can be released without sufficient evidence.

“We strive to supply our loyal customers with a quality local product that is regularly tested to the highest standards required.”

Public Health England say that E.coli can cause a serious infection in those with weakened immune systems or vulnerable groups, including babies, the elderly or pregnant women.



Symptoms of E.coli include stomach cramps and diarrhoea that may be bloody. These usually last up to a week.