Safety warning issued after farmer killed in roof accident

The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has warned farm businesses to pay closer attention to how they manage workplace risk or face serious penalties
The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has warned farm businesses to pay closer attention to how they manage workplace risk or face serious penalties

Farm safety has been cast into the spotlight once more following news that a Nottinghamshire farmer recently died after falling through a roof.

The 53-year-old, who has not yet been named, died on his farm in Stoney Lane, Trowell, just before 3pm on September 30.

The UK's work safety watchdog, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), said a 'self-employed farmer died after a fall through a fragile roof.'

It added that the general nature of the incident was 'fall from height (roof)'.



A HSE spokewoman said: “HSE is aware and is working with the police to determine what happened.”

A spokesman for Nottinghamshire Police added: “Officers were called to a report of a sudden death of a 53-year-old man following a fall through a roof at a farm.



“A file has been prepared for the coroner and the Health and Safety Executive is aware.”

The watchdog has told farmers to pay closer attention to how they manage workplace risk or face serious penalties.

Its programme of inspections, to soon commence, will review health and safety standards on farms across the country.

The inspections will ensure those responsible for protecting themselves and workers are doing the right things to comply with the law.

If they are not, the HSE says it will not hesitate to use enforcement to bring about improvements.

Agriculture has the poorest record of any industry in Britain and latest figures show that 39 people were killed in agriculture across Britain in 2018/19.

This is around 18 times higher than the all industry fatal injury rate.



HSE’s Head of Agriculture, Andrew Turner, said: “These inspections act as a reminder to farmers of the importance of managing risks so that everyone can go home healthy and safe from work.

“Everyone involved in farming has a role to play. Those working in the industry need to understand the risks they face and the simple ways they can be managed.

“Those that work with the industry can be part of the change that is so badly needed.

“Farmers, managers and workers are reminded that death, injuries and cases of ill-health are not an inevitable part of farming,” Mr Turner said.