Sheep farmers asked to share experiences of predator attacks

A new survey has been launched after an increase in predator attacks on Scottish sheep flocks
A new survey has been launched after an increase in predator attacks on Scottish sheep flocks

Scottish sheep farmers and crofters have been encouraged to share their experiences of predator attacks following an increase in cases.

A survey has been created by National Sheep Association (NSA) Scotland in order to present evidence to the government.

Predator control is an important part of conservation and wildlife management for sheep farmers in remote areas of Scotland.

But there have been reports of an increase in the occurrence of predator attacks, NSA Scotland said.



Since the reintroduction of white-tailed eagles, there have been attacks on flocks in the west coast of Scotland, with many farmers experiencing significant losses.

One farmer highlighted in a report from 2019 that his farm had lost an extra 181 lambs in the period between 2012 and 2018.



NSA Scotland explained that the survey's results would support sheep farmers and crofters and enable change to facilitate sustainable sheep farming.

NSA Scottish region coordinator, Grace Reid said it was 'important' for the sector to gather evidence on the matter.

"We are all aware that occurrences are consistently happening, but to gauge the number of attacks is essential in the fight against the animals that threaten our flock animal welfare and profitability.”

This survey takes around 15 minutes and will close to respondents on Tuesday 30 June. It is available on the NSA Scotland website and Facebook page.