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16 January 2018 09:03:23 |Arable,Education,News,Renewables and Environment

Farmers with a passion for soil health wanted for project


Farmers and growers with a passion for soil health have been urged to join the project

Farmers and growers with a passion for soil health have been urged to join the project

Farmers and growers have been urged to sign up to a project which seeks to better understand and manage soil health.
Do you raid your underwear drawer to bury your undies? Does your ability to dig holes rival that of a mole? Do you feel at one with your land?
If so, the AHDB Soil Health Partnership would like to hear from you.
As part of the project, the Partnership are looking for farmers with a passion for soil health to get involved.
It is designed to help farmers and growers better understand and manage soil health. At least six farmer groups are needed, each group comprising 10 to 15 people, to help measure the impact of a range of soil health management innovations.
The innovations were identified, during workshops and a survey held in 2017, as being used on commercial farms in the UK. The groups will help evaluate the potential of these innovations to be used more widely.
The Partnership wants to hear from established groups or individuals who would like to be part of the group.
All respondents will be contacted in February and invited to attend a regional meeting for further planning and discussion.
The final groups chosen will represent a wide range of farms and farming systems across the UK and will be part of the project until 2021.
Soil health
Soil health has been in the limelight recently, with the government's 25-Year Environment Plan focusing on the restoration of soil.
The plan states England’s soils must be “managed sustainably” by 2030, calling it “an important step in the right direction” towards restoring the UK’s soils.
Defra Secretary Michael Gove has been vocal on the subject of soil health. He said the UK will see the "fundamental eradication of soil fertility" because industrial farming has "damaging the earth".
A new group of farmers, the Nature Friendly Farming Network (NFFN), has also been launched to reverse the decline in soil quality.




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